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MEXICO

Whale Watching in Mexico
by Ron Mader

MEXICO WIKI

Nuestra literatura no solo recrea, sino que transmite una enseñanza que busca frenar los males colectivos y las conductas negativa.
- Mexico Notebook

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The Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Cortez are home to blue whales, the largest living creatures on earth, as well as to humpback, sperm, finback, minke, gray, and killer whales.

Whale watching began in California in the mid-1950s. Supporters praise this type of tourism as a 'non-consumptive use' of whales with recreational, educational and scientific dimensions. Local communities can benefit economically from tourism revenues.

MIGRATION

The animals migrate from the chilly Arctic to the Pacific coast of mainland Mexico and Baja California.

Traveling along the Pacific coastline at top speeds of five mph and with pregnant females in the lead, the whales take about four months to make the 10 thousand miles roundtrip. Once the whales reach the Mexican coast, they mate, bask in soothing lagoons and give birth, making January through early April the peak time to whale watch.

BAJA

In Baja California whale-watching takes place in three lagoons:

Laguna Ojo de Liebre: Also known as Scammon's Lagoon, this body of water is located half-way down the peninsula on the Pacific side in Guerrero Negro, about 440 miles south of the border. It was the principal hunting lagoon used by commercial whale hunters in the 19th century. Today tourists arrive to the lagoon by car, but a national airport is also available for tourists flying in from other destinations in Mexico.

Laguna San Ignacio: Located 100 miles south of Laguna Ojo de Liebre, access to this site is mostly through charter air service from international airports such as San Diego and Tijuana.

Bahia Magdalena (Magdalena Bay): This bay in becoming increasingly popular for whale-watching due to its proximity to the La Paz and Loreto airports.

PACIFIC COAST

On the Pacific coast, whales frequent the bays of Nayarit and Jalisco. Regular tours are offered in Puerto Vallarta.


AUTHOR

Ron Mader is the responsible travel correspondent for Transitions Abroad and host of the award-winning Planeta.com website.


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